Community Service Society Photographs

Rare Book & Manuscript Library @ Columbia University

Free School 2

Free School 2
CSS Description
(Negative on file) Box 297 Folder 6 #1654 Stamped Jessie Tarbox Beals Above the decorative doorway at the left: FREE SCHOOL 2. This school, on Henry: street between Pike and Rutgers, was "taken down." along with 3 buildings at each end, when Public School #2 was erected on the site a few years ago. A Plaque on the new building states: 1811 1911 Free School #2 founded on this site Nov. 13, 1811, by the Free School Society of New York. The land was donated by Col. Henry Rutgers. This tablet was erected by the Alumni Association to commemorate the One Hundreth anniversary of the founding of the school. The sign on the door where the children are lined up says, "Lunch served 12:00." The New York School Lunch Committee, "maintained" by the AICP, is mentioned for the first time in "Social and Family Welfare," the Association's 70th Annual Report(1912-1913), pp. 53-56. Under the heading "Report of the New York School Lunch Committee," p. 53, it states: "In co-operation with the Bureau of Welfare of School Children, the New York School Lunch Committee, during the current school year, has extended its service of penny-an-article lunches to nine additional schools, making in all, seventeen schools in which lunches are served to pupils. This extension is administered under the central kitchen plan... All the food is prepared at the central kitchen, and distributed to the associated schools. The last paragraph of the report (p. 56) states, "The work of the School lunch Committee is merely demonstrative, in order to pave the way for the making of the service activity supported and maintained under the control of the Board of Education." This was accomplished by 1919 and reported in "Last Year's Work and This Year's Challenge," the AICP 76th Annual Report (1918-1919), p. 22. "After completing an eight-year [started in 1910-1911 but not retorted?] demonstration of the need of school lunches and of devising effective means of meeting the need, the New York School Lunch Committee has withdrawn from the field to facilitate the transfer of the work to Board of Education where it logically belongs. When the Association took over this work, lunches were being served in 9 public schools, but in 1916, a year unusual economic depression, 49 lunches were maintained. On January 1, 1919, $50,000.00 of city funds were appropriated for school lunch work and the Committee concluded that its mission had been performed..."
Item Information
Title
Free School 2
Date
circa 1912
Item Number
55
Photograph Number
1654
Format
photographs
Corporate Designation
New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor
Borough
Manhattan
Street Names
Henry Street
Pike Street
Rutgers Street
Places
New York (N.Y.); Lower East Side (New York, N.Y.)
Topics
Umbrellas; School children; School buildings; Girls; Children; Buildings; Boys
Names
Free-School Society of New-York
Creators
Beals, Jessie Tarbox
Box and Folder Number
12: 104
CSS Description
(Negative on file) Box 297 Folder 6 #1654 Stamped Jessie Tarbox Beals Above the decorative doorway at the left: FREE SCHOOL 2. This school, on Henry: street between Pike and Rutgers, was "taken down." along with 3 buildings at each end, when Public School #2 was erected on the site a few years ago. A Plaque on the new building states: 1811 1911 Free School #2 founded on this site Nov. 13, 1811, by the Free School Society of New York. The land was donated by Col. Henry Rutgers. This tablet was erected by the Alumni Association to commemorate the One Hundreth anniversary of the founding of the school. The sign on the door where the children are lined up says, "Lunch served 12:00." The New York School Lunch Committee, "maintained" by the AICP, is mentioned for the first time in "Social and Family Welfare," the Association's 70th Annual Report(1912-1913), pp. 53-56. Under the heading "Report of the New York School Lunch Committee," p. 53, it states: "In co-operation with the Bureau of Welfare of School Children, the New York School Lunch Committee, during the current school year, has extended its service of penny-an-article lunches to nine additional schools, making in all, seventeen schools in which lunches are served to pupils. This extension is administered under the central kitchen plan... All the food is prepared at the central kitchen, and distributed to the associated schools. The last paragraph of the report (p. 56) states, "The work of the School lunch Committee is merely demonstrative, in order to pave the way for the making of the service activity supported and maintained under the control of the Board of Education." This was accomplished by 1919 and reported in "Last Year's Work and This Year's Challenge," the AICP 76th Annual Report (1918-1919), p. 22. "After completing an eight-year [started in 1910-1911 but not retorted?] demonstration of the need of school lunches and of devising effective means of meeting the need, the New York School Lunch Committee has withdrawn from the field to facilitate the transfer of the work to Board of Education where it logically belongs. When the Association took over this work, lunches were being served in 9 public schools, but in 1916, a year unusual economic depression, 49 lunches were maintained. On January 1, 1919, $50,000.00 of city funds were appropriated for school lunch work and the Committee concluded that its mission had been performed..."