Community Service Society Photographs

Rare Book & Manuscript Library @ Columbia University

Hudson Street

Hudson Street
CSS Description
(Negative on file and 3 duplicates) #11 Drawing by W. H. Drake In "Forty-First Annual Report of the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, for the year 1884." Page 50 (From the Tenement House Inspectors Report, pp. 35-60.) A rear view of ---- Hudson Street, conveys a good idea of the appearance of hundreds of similar houses in the city. Patched and tinkered up, settled, shaken and worn, added to or lopped off, they bear but a faint trace of their younger days in the long ago. In this particular house may be found many features peculiar to its class. Its roofs afford new inlets for the rain at almost every shower. Its window sashes, supposing them to be movable, will not meet the sill or lintel, and if they did the missing panes are whistled through by the wind. Doors won't shut because the doorway frame has no right angle. Floors are oblique and stairs and balusters are untrustworthy. Such plumbing as existed at the time of ray inspection was as much an inlet for sewer gas as an outlet for waste water.
Item Information
Title
Hudson Street
Date
1884
Item Number
211
Photograph Number
11
Format
illustrations
Corporate Designation
New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor
Borough
Manhattan
Street Names
Hudson Street
Annotation on Back
Negative on file and 3 duplicates
Places
New York (N.Y.)
Topics
Women; Tenement houses; Play; Men; Laundry; Courtyards; Children
Creators
Drake, W. H. (William Henry)
Box and Folder Number
296: 1
CSS Description
(Negative on file and 3 duplicates) #11 Drawing by W. H. Drake In "Forty-First Annual Report of the New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, for the year 1884." Page 50 (From the Tenement House Inspectors Report, pp. 35-60.) A rear view of ---- Hudson Street, conveys a good idea of the appearance of hundreds of similar houses in the city. Patched and tinkered up, settled, shaken and worn, added to or lopped off, they bear but a faint trace of their younger days in the long ago. In this particular house may be found many features peculiar to its class. Its roofs afford new inlets for the rain at almost every shower. Its window sashes, supposing them to be movable, will not meet the sill or lintel, and if they did the missing panes are whistled through by the wind. Doors won't shut because the doorway frame has no right angle. Floors are oblique and stairs and balusters are untrustworthy. Such plumbing as existed at the time of ray inspection was as much an inlet for sewer gas as an outlet for waste water.