Community Service Society Photographs

Rare Book & Manuscript Library @ Columbia University

Model Wet Wash Laundry

Model Wet Wash Laundry
CSS Description
#1030 Unknown Photographer In "Year Book - New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, 1915 (1914-1915), opposite page 78. Caption: The Wet Wash Laundry. A pioneer laundry, at the service of the neighborhood, at cost - sanitary, cheap, clean, quick, reliable, good wages, light, airy. Pages 64 & 65. The Model Wet Wash Laundry The major activity of the Bureau [of Public Health and Hygiene] has been the establishment and operation of a model wet wash laundry. [Steps leading to establishment related.] A canvass of the homes in the neighborhood of the Milbank Bath Building, on East 38th Street [325], clearly indicated that such a laundry would be warmly welcomed. The second floor of the Bath was then altered, and the necessary laundry equipment installed in place of thirty-six shower baths. . . . The charges determined upon were 25 cents for a thirty-pound bundle brought to the laundry and called for, and 35 cents when the collection and delivery system was made use of. On November 16, the laundry began operations. Each month has shown a constantly increasing volume of business, the number of bundles washed per week increasing from 98 to 500. The heavy expenses of wagon service necessitated a change in the charge from 35 cents to 50 cents for bundles collected and delivered by wagon. Also in: Pamphlet "Constructive Social Measures; A Review of Two Year's Work," Department of Social Welfare, AICP, June 1915, opposite page 16. Caption: THE WET WASH LAUNDRY. Cleanliness and Sanitation in Clothes Washing - A close Relation between Decency and Health. Page 19. The Wet Wash Laundry ... at the present time operated to its full capacity, serving an average of about 425 families a week at a charge of 25 cents for 30 pounds of clothes, or 35 cents when collected and delivered . . . AICP "1917 Year Book" (1916-1917), page 13 top. Caption: WET-WASH LAUNDRY substitutes for eight hundred mothers at a cost of thirty-five cents weekly modern facilities and sterilizing process for back-breaking work without laundry conveniences. The Wet Wash Laundry was discontinued in 19.
Item Information
Title
Model Wet Wash Laundry
Date
circa 1914
Item Number
242
Photograph Number
1030
Format
photographs
Corporate Designation
New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor
Borough
Manhattan
Street Names
East 38th Street, 325-327
Places
New York (N.Y.)
Topics
Washing machines; Milbank Memorial Bath (New York, N.Y.); Men; Laundry workers; Laundry machinery; Laundry industry; Laundry; Baskets
Box and Folder Number
296: 32
CSS Description
#1030 Unknown Photographer In "Year Book - New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, 1915 (1914-1915), opposite page 78. Caption: The Wet Wash Laundry. A pioneer laundry, at the service of the neighborhood, at cost - sanitary, cheap, clean, quick, reliable, good wages, light, airy. Pages 64 & 65. The Model Wet Wash Laundry The major activity of the Bureau [of Public Health and Hygiene] has been the establishment and operation of a model wet wash laundry. [Steps leading to establishment related.] A canvass of the homes in the neighborhood of the Milbank Bath Building, on East 38th Street [325], clearly indicated that such a laundry would be warmly welcomed. The second floor of the Bath was then altered, and the necessary laundry equipment installed in place of thirty-six shower baths. . . . The charges determined upon were 25 cents for a thirty-pound bundle brought to the laundry and called for, and 35 cents when the collection and delivery system was made use of. On November 16, the laundry began operations. Each month has shown a constantly increasing volume of business, the number of bundles washed per week increasing from 98 to 500. The heavy expenses of wagon service necessitated a change in the charge from 35 cents to 50 cents for bundles collected and delivered by wagon. Also in: Pamphlet "Constructive Social Measures; A Review of Two Year's Work," Department of Social Welfare, AICP, June 1915, opposite page 16. Caption: THE WET WASH LAUNDRY. Cleanliness and Sanitation in Clothes Washing - A close Relation between Decency and Health. Page 19. The Wet Wash Laundry ... at the present time operated to its full capacity, serving an average of about 425 families a week at a charge of 25 cents for 30 pounds of clothes, or 35 cents when collected and delivered . . . AICP "1917 Year Book" (1916-1917), page 13 top. Caption: WET-WASH LAUNDRY substitutes for eight hundred mothers at a cost of thirty-five cents weekly modern facilities and sterilizing process for back-breaking work without laundry conveniences. The Wet Wash Laundry was discontinued in 19.