Community Service Society Photographs

Rare Book & Manuscript Library @ Columbia University

Mulberry Health Center Album -- Mothers and Kiddies Waiting for Care

Mulberry Health Center Album -- Mothers and Kiddies Waiting for Care
CSS Description
#4402 From: Mulberry Health Center Album Unknown Photographer In Bagdad on the Subway: A Periodical of Association [AICP] News, No. 7, September 1919, p. 15. Used as illustration in article entitled, "Child Health Work," pp. 15-l6. Caption: Mothers and Kiddies Waiting for Care. Excerpt from article, p.16. "The district chosen is the most predominantly Italian in New York City and is provided with only a minimum of public health and social agencies. According to the census of 1910, the population was 38,269, of whom 34,848 were Italians, either foreign born or of foreign parentage. It comprises forty-four city blocks of which seventeen are devoted entirely to business, leaving an average population of about 1,400 per block ... It is a far cry from sunny Italy to the crowded tenements with their dark, unventilated rooms . . . In AICP pamphlet "Developing Child Health via Community Organization," c1919, page 11. Caption: Mothers with their children of all ages patiently waiting their turn to hear the doctor's verdict.
Item Information
Title
Mulberry Health Center Album -- Mothers and Kiddies Waiting for Care
Date
1919
Item Number
554
Photograph Number
4402
Format
photographs
Corporate Designation
New York Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor
Borough
Manhattan
Annotation on Back
From: Mulberry Health Center Album
Places
New York (N.Y.)
Topics
Women; Mothers; Italian Americans; Children--Health and hygiene; Children
Names
Mulberry Health Center (New York, N.Y.)
Box and Folder Number
299: 71
CSS Description
#4402 From: Mulberry Health Center Album Unknown Photographer In Bagdad on the Subway: A Periodical of Association [AICP] News, No. 7, September 1919, p. 15. Used as illustration in article entitled, "Child Health Work," pp. 15-l6. Caption: Mothers and Kiddies Waiting for Care. Excerpt from article, p.16. "The district chosen is the most predominantly Italian in New York City and is provided with only a minimum of public health and social agencies. According to the census of 1910, the population was 38,269, of whom 34,848 were Italians, either foreign born or of foreign parentage. It comprises forty-four city blocks of which seventeen are devoted entirely to business, leaving an average population of about 1,400 per block ... It is a far cry from sunny Italy to the crowded tenements with their dark, unventilated rooms . . . In AICP pamphlet "Developing Child Health via Community Organization," c1919, page 11. Caption: Mothers with their children of all ages patiently waiting their turn to hear the doctor's verdict.