Community Service Society Photographs

Rare Book & Manuscript Library @ Columbia University

Hudson Park on Lower West Side

Hudson Park on Lower West Side
CSS Description
#313 “Wurtz (?) Bros. Photo” Looking east toward Seventh Avenue South from Hudson Street. The street on the left is St. Luke’s Place, a one block interruption of Leroy Street, and the one on the right is Clarkson Street. Frontispiece in Vol. II of “The Tenement House Problem; Including the Report of the New York State Tenement House Commission of 1900,” by Various Writers, edited by Robert W. DeForest and Lawrence Veiller. N.Y., Macmillan, c1903. (The handwriting on this picture and #312 may be that of one of the authors when preparing the volumes for the printers. From signatures in the files, the writing looks more like that of Robert W. DeForest than of Lawrence Veiller.) The official name of the park today (1971) is the James J. Walker Park. “Jimmie” Walker was elected Mayor of New York City in 1926 and resigned September 1, 1932, as a result of an “inquiry into corruption in conduct of his office.” Usually referred to as the Seabury investigation. The Walker family residence was at 6 St. Luke’s Place, which may account for the re-naming of the park. There isn’t a blade of grass or a tree in the park today. The entire area has been asphalted over for the playing of various games – tennis, basketball, football, even bocci, an Italian game somewhat like bowling. Before the area was “converted” into a park in 1898, it was the burial ground for Trinity Parish (see #576). The only reminder today that the park was once a cemetery is the Firemen’s Monument, at present stuck into the left (St. Luke’s Place) corner on the Seventh Avenue South side. This memorial was erected to commemorate two members of Engine 13 of the N.Y. Volunteer Fire Department, Eugene Underhill, 20 years old, and Frederick A. Ward, 22, who died fighting a fire in Pearl Street, July 1, 1839.
Item Information
Title
Hudson Park on Lower West Side
Date
circa 1900
Item Number
1260
Photograph Number
313
Format
photographs
Borough
Manhattan
Street Names
St. Luke's Place
Hudson Street
Seventh Avenue
Annotation on Front
Frontispiece to Vol. II. Hudson Park. On the lower West side
Places
New York (N.Y.); James J. Walker Park (New York, N.Y.)
Topics
Parks; Memorials
Creators
Wurts Bros. (New York, N.Y.)
Box and Folder Number
296: 36
CSS Description
#313 “Wurtz (?) Bros. Photo” Looking east toward Seventh Avenue South from Hudson Street. The street on the left is St. Luke’s Place, a one block interruption of Leroy Street, and the one on the right is Clarkson Street. Frontispiece in Vol. II of “The Tenement House Problem; Including the Report of the New York State Tenement House Commission of 1900,” by Various Writers, edited by Robert W. DeForest and Lawrence Veiller. N.Y., Macmillan, c1903. (The handwriting on this picture and #312 may be that of one of the authors when preparing the volumes for the printers. From signatures in the files, the writing looks more like that of Robert W. DeForest than of Lawrence Veiller.) The official name of the park today (1971) is the James J. Walker Park. “Jimmie” Walker was elected Mayor of New York City in 1926 and resigned September 1, 1932, as a result of an “inquiry into corruption in conduct of his office.” Usually referred to as the Seabury investigation. The Walker family residence was at 6 St. Luke’s Place, which may account for the re-naming of the park. There isn’t a blade of grass or a tree in the park today. The entire area has been asphalted over for the playing of various games – tennis, basketball, football, even bocci, an Italian game somewhat like bowling. Before the area was “converted” into a park in 1898, it was the burial ground for Trinity Parish (see #576). The only reminder today that the park was once a cemetery is the Firemen’s Monument, at present stuck into the left (St. Luke’s Place) corner on the Seventh Avenue South side. This memorial was erected to commemorate two members of Engine 13 of the N.Y. Volunteer Fire Department, Eugene Underhill, 20 years old, and Frederick A. Ward, 22, who died fighting a fire in Pearl Street, July 1, 1839.